Angry At Your Partner

The other day while we were driving in the car, Christian was angry.

Not at me. He was frustrated that his back wasn’t healed enough yet for him to be able to drive himself long distances. So I did what any loving wife would do. I got mad at him for being mad.

You may have heard the saying, “You become like who you are around.” Mostly what the saying means, is that if you hang out with people who are not successful and playing big, chances are YOU will not be successful or play big.

There is another way this dynamic plays out in relationship. When Christian gets mad about something, I get mad at him for being mad. I become like him. Which doesn’t help, by the way, it just accelerates his anger, because he now adds “being mad at me for being mad at him” to the mix. When he withdraws, I withdraw too. When he judges, I judge him for judging. Christian does the same with me. And we both do it with our kids.

This plays out so fast that we barely notice how we “become just like who we are around.”

Now, it is NOT my intention for us to both be pissed, withdrawn and judgmental. And it is not Christian’s intention either. Even though that is what gets produced.

We know it is the same for you – that when you “match” your partner’s moods or thoughts, you don’t want a miserable experience either!

Our unconscious positive intention in matching our partner’s emotion is for the bad feelings to go away and the good ones to return. Some part of me actually believes that if I get mad at him for being mad, he will quit being mad!

Crazy, eh?

So how do you change this dynamic?

First thing is to notice it. Become aware that you are doing exactly the behavior or emotion you are resisting.

Next, is to realize that you want something sweet and good underneath your bad feeling. For instance, in the car, I noticed that I really wanted Christian to feel good and happy and for us to have a fun sweet time together. That was the reason for my wanting him to not be mad.

As I saw that in myself, I was able to see that in Christian too. He just wanted to feel good, happy and in his power too.

Seeing that he wanted something sweet and good underneath his anger softened my heart. It took me out of mad, back into love.

When we connect with the positive intent underneath bad feelings, annoyance gets replaced with compassion, and separation gets replaced with connection. “We are the same. We feel the same. We both want something good.”

Once we understand that a pure innocent desire for love, connection and all things good is underneath our anger, we can reach out in love from that new place.

As a result, instead of meeting Christian’s anger with more anger, I was able to meet his anger with love, and give him a chance to “become like who he was around.” I complimented him for his desire to feel good and appreciated his aspiration to drive the car. We ended up stopping for food, enjoying delicious sandwiches together, and he successfully drove the next half hour to our destination.

Soon after, we were playing, giggling and in the end, enjoyed a wonderful evening together.

Next time you notice yourself “matching” your partner’s mood, slow things down.

Look for the positive reason you are mad or sad or upset underneath, and instead of both of you spiraling down into a crummy experience, lead both of you to an upward spiral of deeper love, connection and joy.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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